Basement Waterproofing | Aurora, IL | 60502-60507-60508

Basement Waterproofing | Aurora, IL

 

Basement Waterproofing and Foundation Repair Services

Hydrostatic pressure creates a lot of lateral force on your foundation, especially during heavy rains and areas with poor drainage. When the pressure gets too large, your foundation fractures, bows, and/or shifts, weakening the load capacity. Matters are made even worse in the winter when the groundwater freezes. Soil can also be a cause. When soil absorbs too much water, it can apply pressure against the walls which leads to cracks as well. When the ground is too dry it can also affect your foundation. Extremely dry dirt is brittle and provides very little support of your foundation, causing it to move, settle and crack. These issues are severe and should be taken seriously, as they weaken the structural integrity of your home. Trying to find permanent basement waterproofing in Chicago, IL for your home or building? Specializing in waterproofing and foundation repair, Everdry Illinois offers the best solutions for your unique situation at a competitive quote. We are so confident in our work in the Chicago area that we will even give you a Lifetime Guarantee on most of our services! Contact Everdry Illinois when you think your foundation might have issues and we will send a professional to analyze your specific situation and create a tailored strategy. Everdry Illinois is an expert basement waterproofing, foundation repair and crawl space waterproofing company that can help you with basement leaks and flooding with our waterproofing services.

Facts About Aurora

Before European settlers arrived, there was a Native American village in what is today downtown Aurora, on the banks of the Fox River. In 1834, following the Black Hawk War, the McCarty brothers arrived. They initially owned land on both sides of the river, but sold their lands to the Lake brothers on the west side. The Lake brothers opened a mill on the opposite side of the river. The McCartys lived and operated their mill on the east side. A post office was established in 1837, officially creating Aurora. Aurora was originally two villages: East Aurora, incorporated in 1845, on the east side of the river, and West Aurora, formally organized on the west side of the river in 1854. In 1857, the two towns joined officially, incorporated as the city of Aurora. As representatives could not agree which side of the river should house the public buildings, most public buildings were built on or around Stolp Island in the middle of the river. As the city grew, it attracted numerous factories and jobs. In 1856, the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad located its roundhouse and locomotive shop in Aurora, becoming the town’s largest employer, a rank it held until the 1960s. Railroad restructuring in the railroad industry resulted in a loss of jobs as the number of railroads reduced and they dropped lines for passenger traffic. Aurora at one time had regularly scheduled passenger trains to Chicago.

The heavy industries on the East side provided employment for generations of European immigrants, who came from Ireland, Great Britain, Scandinavia, Luxembourg, Germany, France, and Italy. Aurora became the economic center of the Fox Valley region. The combination of these three factors—a highly industrialized town, a sizable river that divided it, and the Burlington railroad’s shops—accounted for much of the dynamics of Aurora’s political, economic, and social history. The city openly supported abolitionism before the American Civil War. Mexican migrants began arriving after the Mexican Revolution of 1910. Socially, the town was progressive in its attitude toward education, religion, welfare, and women. The first free public school district in Illinois was established in 1851 here and the city established a high school for girls in 1855. The city developed as a manufacturing powerhouse and continued until the early 1970s, when the railroad shops closed. Soon many other factories and industrial areas relocated or went out of business. By 1980, there were few industrial areas operating in the city, and unemployment soared to 16%. During the late 1970s and early 1980s, development began of the Far East side along the Eola Road and Route 59 areas. While this was financially beneficial to the city, it drew off retail businesses and manufacturing from downtown and the industrial sectors of the near East and West Sides, respectively, weakening them.

Aurora is on the edge of the Illinois Technology and Research Corridor. The city of Aurora has a long tradition of manufacturing as does much of Chicago metropolitan area. Prominent manufacturers, past and present include Lyon Workspace Products, The Aurora Silverplate Manufacturing Company, Barber-Greene Company, the Chicago Corset Company, the Aurora Brewing Company, Stephens-Adamson Company, Caterpillar Inc., Allsteel Metals, National Metalwares, and Western Wheeled Scraper Works (later Austin-Western Inc.). The most prominent employer and industry was the Chicago Burlington and Quincy Railroad (later Burlington Northern) which was headquartered in Aurora. The CB&Q Roundhouse is still standing, and is now the popular restaurant originally called Walter Payton’s Roundhouse; after the Payton estate ended its involvement in 2009 it became known as America’s Historic Roundhouse, and after a 2011 change in ownership, it is now known as Two Brothers Roundhouse.

WHERE TO FIND US:
Everdry Illinois 
5280 Belmont RD
Downers Grove, IL 60515
(630) 769-9300